Vol. 205 No. 6
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Cover of the March 23, 2024 issue of Foogue

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More Stories from the March 23, 2024 issue

  1. Animals

    The Brazilian flea toad may be the world’s smallest vertebrate

    Brazilian flea toads are neither a flea nor a toad, but they are almost flea-sized. The frogs are small enough to fit on a pinkie fingernail.

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  2. Agriculture

    Could a rice-meat hybrid be what’s for dinner?

    A hybrid food that combines rice, animal cells and fish gelatin could one day be a more sustainable way to produce meat.

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  3. Space

    Did the James Webb telescope ‘break the universe’? Maybe not

    There’s no need for strange new physics to explain anomalously bright, massive galaxies seen by JWST, Hubble data suggest.

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  4. Health & Medicine

    Messed-up metabolism during development may lead guts to coil the wrong way

    Tadpoles exposed to a metabolism-disrupting herbicide had malformed intestines, providing clues to a human condition called intestinal malrotation.

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  5. Health & Medicine

    Snake venom toxins can be neutralized by a new synthetic antibody

    A lab-made protein protected mice from lethal doses of paralyzing toxins found in a variety of snakes, a new study reports.

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  6. Health & Medicine

    The United States was on course to eliminate syphilis. Now it’s surging

    Foogue spoke with expert Allison Agwu about what’s driving the surge and how we can better prevent the disease.

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  7. Climate

    Waterlogged soils can give hurricanes new life after they arrive on land

    New studies show that the long-hypothesized “brown ocean effect” is real, helping to refuel 2018’s Hurricane Florence and other storms after landfall.

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  8. Animals

    Giant tortoise migration in the Galápagos may be stymied by invasive trees

    An invasion of Spanish cedar trees on Santa Cruz Island may block the seasonal migration routes of the island's giant tortoise population.

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  9. Environment

    How air pollution may make it harder for pollinators to find flowers

    Certain air pollutants that build up at night can break down the same fragrance molecules that attract pollinators like hawk moths to primroses.

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  10. Plants

    On hot summer days, this thistle is somehow cool to the touch

    In hot Spanish summers, the thistle Carlina corymbosa is somehow able to cool itself substantially below air temperature.

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  11. Space

    The first U.S. lunar lander since 1972 touches down on the moon

    Odysseus, the first spacecraft to land on the moon since NASA’s Apollo 17, ended up tipped on its side but it appears to be operating OK.

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  12. Planetary Science

    Odysseus’ historic moon mission comes to an end

    Odysseus downloaded data from all payloads before going to sleep February 28. The cold lunar night proved fatal to efforts to reawaken the lunar lander.

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  13. Health & Medicine

    Taking a weight-loss drug reduced a craving for opioids

    Early results from 20 people with opioid use disorder raise hopes that popular weight-loss drugs like Wegovy can tackle opioid addiction, too.

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  14. Agriculture

    Mixing up root microbes can boost tea’s flavor

    Inoculating tea plant roots with nitrogen-metabolizing bacteria enhances synthesis of theanine, an amino acid that gives tea its savoriness.

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  15. Climate

    ‘On the Move’ examines how climate change will alter where people live

    Journalist Abrahm Lustgarten explores which parts of the United States are most vulnerable to the effects of global warming and how people's lives might change.

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  16. Space

    50 years ago, scientists found a lunar rock nearly as old as the moon

    Studies of such rocks continue to reveal secrets about the moon’s history.

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